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America’s Senator Jeff Sessions Connects Smart Machines And Immigration

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    America’s Senator Jeff Sessions Connects Smart Machines And Immigration
    (13 May '18)

    This federal policy continues at a time when robotics and computerization are slashing demand for workers. One Oxford University professor estimates that as many as half of all jobs will be automated in 20? We don’t have enough jobs for our lower-skilled workers now. What sense does it make to bring in millions more? If no immigration curbs are enacted, the Census Bureau estimates that another 14? United States between now and 2025. That means we will introduce a new population almost four times larger than that of Los Angeles in just 10 years time. The percentage of the country that is foreign-born is on track to rapidly eclipse any previous historical peak and to continue rising. Imagine the pressure this will put on wages, as well as schools, hospitals and many other community resources. It is not mainstream, but extreme, to continue surging immigration beyond any historical precedent and to do so at a time when almost 1 in 4 Americans age 25 to 54 does not have a job. What we need now is immigration moderation: slowing the pace of new arrivals so that wages can rise, welfare rolls can shrink and the forces of assimilation can knit us all more closely together. But high immigration rates help the financial elite (and the political elite who receive their contributions) by keeping wages down and profits up. For them, what’s not to like? That is why they have tried to enforce silence in the face of public desire for immigration reductions. They have sought to intimidate good and decent Americans into avoiding honest discussion of how uncontrolled immigration impacts their lives. But that dam is breaking. The elite consensus is crumbling — and the enforced silence on this critical issue will end.

    Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said at a CNN town hall Wednesday night that if there is any substance to the allegations, then Sessions cannot be the person to assess them because he was one of Trump’s senior campaign advisers. If there is something there and it goes up the chain of investigation, it is clear to me that Jeff Sessions, who is my dear friend, cannot make that decision about Trump," Graham said. There may be nothing there," he continued. But if there’s something there that the FBI believes is criminal in nature, then for sure you need a special prosecutor. Several Democratic lawmakers on Wednesday night questioned whether Sessions had lied under oath when he testified at his confirmation hearing in January that he had not had any communications with Russian officials. Reps. Jared Polis, D-Colo., and Mike Quigley, D-Ill., asked whether the former senator provided false statements in his testimony to lawmakers. On Twitter, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. Trump antagonist - repeated calls for a special prosecutor to probe Russian influence in the elections and ties to Trump. She also called on Sessions to resign. And we need Attorney General Jeff Sessions - who should have never been confirmed in the first place - to resign. We need it now.

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions is rescinding a policy that allowed legalized marijuana to flourish in states across the country without federal intervention. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is rescinding a policy that allowed legalized marijuana to flourish in states across the country without federal intervention. The Trump administration threw the nation's burgeoning movement to legalize marijuana into uncertainty Thursday, terminating an Obama-era leniency policy that kept federal authorities from cracking down in states that have declared it legal. Prosecutors can now go after the cannabis trade whenever state and federal drug laws collide, Attorney General Jeff Sessions declared. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is rescinding a policy that allowed legalized marijuana to flourish in states across the country without federal intervention. U.S. Senate seat previously held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Moore, a Republican, lost the race to Doug Jones, the first Alabama Democrat elected to the U.S. Senate in 25 years. Attorney General Jeff Sessions testified in front of a House committee and was grilled about the 2016 election, Russia collusion, immigration, drug policies and much more. Here's a roundup of the heated hearing. Attorney General Jeff Sessions was on Capitol Hill Tuesday morning to face congressional investigators amid new evidence of Russian collusion in the 2016 presidential election. The former Alabama senator was questioned by the House Judiciary Committee regarding just how much he knew about alleged Russian contacts’ involvement with the Trump campaign. The appearance came after the FBI revealed a former Trump campaign aide pleaded guilty to making false statements to the intelligence arm. And another former adviser recently testified that Sessions, 70, knew about a trip he took to Russia during the campaign. Read on for a timeline of Sessions’ involvement with President Trump’s campaign and the Russia election. June 16, 2015 - Donald Trump officially announces his candidacy for president at an event in Manhattan.

    He met with him in September. CORNISH: Now, when the attorney general was asked about that today at the press conference, how did he explain this discrepancy? KEITH: He said that he met with the ambassador in his role as a senator and as a member of the Armed Services Committee just as he had met with other ambassadors from other countries. But here's how he explained the answer that he gave to Franken. SESSIONS: I was taken aback a little bit about this brand new information, this allegation that surrogates - and I had been called a surrogate for Donald Trump - had been meeting continuously with Russian officials. And that's what I - it struck me very hard, and that's what I focused my answer on. And in retrospect, I should have slowed down and said, but I did meet one Russian official a couple of times. That would be the ambassador. Since coming to office, Sessions has taken a hard line on marijuana users. The attorney general asked congressional leaders to remove federal protections that stopped the DOJ from interfering with medical marijuana enterprises that operated in accordance with state law. A new DOJ report to be published - http://Www.broowaha.com/search/published this week by the Task Force on Crime Reduction and Public Safety—led by Sessions—is expected to link marijuana to violent crime and advocate tougher sentences on users, producers and sellers of the drug. Here is more on tim viec lam them - http://cafenets.com/c2/viec-lam-24h stop by our own page. Washington, whose playing career ended in 1999, has been a vocal advocate for the use of medical marijuana in football. He has lobbied the NFL to promote medical marijuana as an effective means of pain relief. Washington played eight seasons with the Jets, while also playing for the San Francisco 49ers and the Denver Broncos in a 11-year career. He won the Super Bowl XXXIII in 1999 with the Broncos.

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions spoke twice with Russia’s ambassador to the U.S. Justice Department investigation into Russian interference in the U.S. Then-Sen. Sessions (R-Ala.) sat down with Sergey Kislyak at the height of what intelligence officials describe as a Moscow-based cyber campaign intended to influence the U.S. Washington Post first reported on Wednesday. Sessions said under oath at his confirmation hearings in January that he had no contact with the Russian government during the campaign. One of the meetings was a private conversation between Session and Kislyak that took place in September in the senator’s office. Sessions was a senior member of the Armed Services Committee and serving as a top foreign policy advisor to the Trump campaign at the time. Trump has denied any of his associates had contact with Moscow before last year’s election and has dismissed the controversy as a "scam" perpetrated by "fake news" media. Moscow has also denied the accusations. Attorney General Jeff Sessions held an event to discuss "leaks of classified material threatening national security" Friday. Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Friday announced a crackdown on leaks coming out of the government, promising to devote resources to a vigorous pursuit of criminal prosecutions for the disclosures that have angered and frustrated President Donald Trump. Sessions, flanked by his deputy, Rod Rosenstein, and Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, said in a press conference at the Department of Justice. Sessions said referrals to investigate unauthorized disclosures of criminal investigations have "exploded" since the new administration took office, adding that four people have already been charged with unlawfully disclosing classified material or with concealing contacts with foreign intelligence officers. He said the department is devoting more attention to those cases, including forming a new unit at the FBI. The FBI on Friday referred questions about the unit to the Justice Department.

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on May 13, 2018

This federal policy continues at a time when robotics and computerization are slashing demand for workers. One Oxford University professor estimates that as many as half of all jobs will be automated in 20? We don’t have enough jobs for our lower-skilled workers now. What sense does it make to bring in millions more? If no immigration curbs are enacted, the Census Bureau estimates that another 14? United States between now and 2025. That means we will introduce a new population almost four times larger than that of Los Angeles in just 10 years time. The percentage of the country that is foreign-born is on track to rapidly eclipse any previous historical peak and to continue rising. Imagine the pressure this will put on wages, as well as schools, hospitals and many other community resources. It is not mainstream, but extreme, to continue surging immigration beyond any historical precedent and to do so at a time when almost 1 in 4 Americans age 25 to 54 does not have a job. What we need now is immigration moderation: slowing the pace of new arrivals so that wages can rise, welfare rolls can shrink and the forces of assimilation can knit us all more closely together. But high immigration rates help the financial elite (and the political elite who receive their contributions) by keeping wages down and profits up. For them, what’s not to like? That is why they have tried to enforce silence in the face of public desire for immigration reductions. They have sought to intimidate good and decent Americans into avoiding honest discussion of how uncontrolled immigration impacts their lives. But that dam is breaking. The elite consensus is crumbling — and the enforced silence on this critical issue will end.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said at a CNN town hall Wednesday night that if there is any substance to the allegations, then Sessions cannot be the person to assess them because he was one of Trump’s senior campaign advisers. If there is something there and it goes up the chain of investigation, it is clear to me that Jeff Sessions, who is my dear friend, cannot make that decision about Trump," Graham said. There may be nothing there," he continued. But if there’s something there that the FBI believes is criminal in nature, then for sure you need a special prosecutor. Several Democratic lawmakers on Wednesday night questioned whether Sessions had lied under oath when he testified at his confirmation hearing in January that he had not had any communications with Russian officials. Reps. Jared Polis, D-Colo., and Mike Quigley, D-Ill., asked whether the former senator provided false statements in his testimony to lawmakers. On Twitter, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. Trump antagonist - repeated calls for a special prosecutor to probe Russian influence in the elections and ties to Trump. She also called on Sessions to resign. And we need Attorney General Jeff Sessions - who should have never been confirmed in the first place - to resign. We need it now.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is rescinding a policy that allowed legalized marijuana to flourish in states across the country without federal intervention. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is rescinding a policy that allowed legalized marijuana to flourish in states across the country without federal intervention. The Trump administration threw the nation's burgeoning movement to legalize marijuana into uncertainty Thursday, terminating an Obama-era leniency policy that kept federal authorities from cracking down in states that have declared it legal. Prosecutors can now go after the cannabis trade whenever state and federal drug laws collide, Attorney General Jeff Sessions declared. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is rescinding a policy that allowed legalized marijuana to flourish in states across the country without federal intervention. U.S. Senate seat previously held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Moore, a Republican, lost the race to Doug Jones, the first Alabama Democrat elected to the U.S. Senate in 25 years. Attorney General Jeff Sessions testified in front of a House committee and was grilled about the 2016 election, Russia collusion, immigration, drug policies and much more. Here's a roundup of the heated hearing. Attorney General Jeff Sessions was on Capitol Hill Tuesday morning to face congressional investigators amid new evidence of Russian collusion in the 2016 presidential election. The former Alabama senator was questioned by the House Judiciary Committee regarding just how much he knew about alleged Russian contacts’ involvement with the Trump campaign. The appearance came after the FBI revealed a former Trump campaign aide pleaded guilty to making false statements to the intelligence arm. And another former adviser recently testified that Sessions, 70, knew about a trip he took to Russia during the campaign. Read on for a timeline of Sessions’ involvement with President Trump’s campaign and the Russia election. June 16, 2015 - Donald Trump officially announces his candidacy for president at an event in Manhattan.

He met with him in September. CORNISH: Now, when the attorney general was asked about that today at the press conference, how did he explain this discrepancy? KEITH: He said that he met with the ambassador in his role as a senator and as a member of the Armed Services Committee just as he had met with other ambassadors from other countries. But here's how he explained the answer that he gave to Franken. SESSIONS: I was taken aback a little bit about this brand new information, this allegation that surrogates - and I had been called a surrogate for Donald Trump - had been meeting continuously with Russian officials. And that's what I - it struck me very hard, and that's what I focused my answer on. And in retrospect, I should have slowed down and said, but I did meet one Russian official a couple of times. That would be the ambassador. Since coming to office, Sessions has taken a hard line on marijuana users. The attorney general asked congressional leaders to remove federal protections that stopped the DOJ from interfering with medical marijuana enterprises that operated in accordance with state law. A new DOJ report to be published - http://Www.broowaha.com/search/published this week by the Task Force on Crime Reduction and Public Safety—led by Sessions—is expected to link marijuana to violent crime and advocate tougher sentences on users, producers and sellers of the drug. Here is more on tim viec lam them - http://cafenets.com/c2/viec-lam-24h stop by our own page. Washington, whose playing career ended in 1999, has been a vocal advocate for the use of medical marijuana in football. He has lobbied the NFL to promote medical marijuana as an effective means of pain relief. Washington played eight seasons with the Jets, while also playing for the San Francisco 49ers and the Denver Broncos in a 11-year career. He won the Super Bowl XXXIII in 1999 with the Broncos.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions spoke twice with Russia’s ambassador to the U.S. Justice Department investigation into Russian interference in the U.S. Then-Sen. Sessions (R-Ala.) sat down with Sergey Kislyak at the height of what intelligence officials describe as a Moscow-based cyber campaign intended to influence the U.S. Washington Post first reported on Wednesday. Sessions said under oath at his confirmation hearings in January that he had no contact with the Russian government during the campaign. One of the meetings was a private conversation between Session and Kislyak that took place in September in the senator’s office. Sessions was a senior member of the Armed Services Committee and serving as a top foreign policy advisor to the Trump campaign at the time. Trump has denied any of his associates had contact with Moscow before last year’s election and has dismissed the controversy as a "scam" perpetrated by "fake news" media. Moscow has also denied the accusations. Attorney General Jeff Sessions held an event to discuss "leaks of classified material threatening national security" Friday. Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Friday announced a crackdown on leaks coming out of the government, promising to devote resources to a vigorous pursuit of criminal prosecutions for the disclosures that have angered and frustrated President Donald Trump. Sessions, flanked by his deputy, Rod Rosenstein, and Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, said in a press conference at the Department of Justice. Sessions said referrals to investigate unauthorized disclosures of criminal investigations have "exploded" since the new administration took office, adding that four people have already been charged with unlawfully disclosing classified material or with concealing contacts with foreign intelligence officers. He said the department is devoting more attention to those cases, including forming a new unit at the FBI. The FBI on Friday referred questions about the unit to the Justice Department.